Tag Archives: evidence-based medicine

Addressing Societal Health Issues at a Root Cause Level

As we continue to grapple with various disease states like obesity and diabetes, which impact a significant number of people, our ability to change human behaviors is minimal. We continuously design interventions that include education and behavioral modification with limited results. In essence, we appear to be attempting to prevent water from streaming out of the hose by… Read More »

Peer Comparisons Can Enhance Value

As the healthcare industry continues to focus on value (improved quality and service, and decreased cost), understanding the human dynamics of physician healthcare providers will enhance our ability to drive change. Incentives are foundational, however, money is not always the primary motivator. Behavioral Science postulates that different people respond differently to similar incentives. We know there is a… Read More »

Preconceived Ideas Don’t Always Lead to What We Expect

A commonly held premise of shared decision-making is that the healthcare profession neither adequately gives specific treatment options nor discusses the trade-offs of surgical intervention. Predominantly, the thought is that if more in-depth conversations were to occur concerning the trade-offs, and there is more appropriate management of expectations, the chosen solution would be the more conservative approach. With… Read More »

What Happens When I am Proven Wrong?

“Hot-spotting” is a method in healthcare to identify areas for intervention. The premise suggests, if I can identify a segment that is responsible for most of a situation and change its trajectory, a positive outcome will occur. This premise is the basis for disease management, and now value-based care concerning social determinants of health. However, a recent randomized… Read More »

Looking at the Liability of Artificial Intelligence

As we continue to embrace technology and machine learning to improve care, it is essential to focus on situations as they arise, and advocate adjustments that allow us to evolve. One such area that requires further scrutiny is Physician liability and artificial intelligence (AI). Undeniably, AI is by no means flawless since it involves machine learning on present… Read More »

Practicing Evidence-Based Medicine

As we focus on delivering value, and decreasing waste, clinical appropriateness needs to be considered on a daily basis. Unfortunately, much variation is due to the lack of health care providers following evidence-based guidelines. There are various reasons this occurs, including a lack of consensus between medical societies, ease of disseminating new information when it is published, as… Read More »

Self-regulation Should Be a Part of Professionalism

A profession is defined as an occupation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested, objective counsel and service to others for direct and definite compensation. The two key components of this very “matter of fact” definition are specialized educational training and offering a service to others for payment. Unquestionably, those that provide… Read More »

Is “the Person” the Missing Component in Medical Education?

If one delves back in history, the fundamental component of medical education is focused on holistic care, meaning, caring for those we serve within the context of body, mind, and spirit. In more recent times, the focus has moved to diagnosing and treating the physiologic condition. However, studies have shown a person’s environment, behavior and lifestyle have a… Read More »