Tag Archives: healthcare delivery

Exploring Quality as the Use of Virtual Care Expands

The COVID-19 pandemic has elevated the speed at which we have converted to virtual care. Physicians and consumers have substantially increased their use of virtual visits and digital applications. This care includes interactions concerning diagnosis, evaluation, and management of conditions that historically have occurred in person. Because of this, many questions arise concerning the quality and utilization of… Read More »

Taking a Closer Look at Capitation for Value-Based Care

As we focus on delivering value-based care; higher quality at a more affordable price, the conversation concerning payment models rapidly pivots to global capitation for a population of lives. The opposite payment model is a fee-for-service model, and currently, there is a belief that service-based fees lead to an over-utilization of services. Consequently, many believe the only possible… Read More »

Promoting Transparency for our Consumers

With the first month of the New Year nearly behind us, and new transparency regulations becoming law, Healthcare faces increasing challenges when it comes to consumerism. Using such a framework is appropriate as the persons to whom we provide services of our “goods” do “consume” them; however, compared to consumers of other types of products it is not… Read More »

Building Trust in the Patient-Clinician Relationship

Last week I shared a post, Understanding and Instilling Trust in Our Patients, today’s post takes a deeper look at how to build that trust between patient and clinician. As we continue to focus on building patient trust, it’s necessary to recognize that one’s own characteristics play a critical role. For those times that we are dealing with… Read More »

Understanding and Instilling Trust in Our Patients

Periodically, there are discussions regarding the critical component of trust in healthcare. Currently, the present pandemic is a prime example of the issue. Some, we observe, inherently trust science; others prefer the approach, I need to distrust you until you prove to me you are trustworthy. A third category proclaims I trust you; however, I must verify the… Read More »

Cognitive Assessments Can Help Identify Needed Care

As we age, cognitive impairment becomes more likely. Simultaneously, our natural living conditions increase isolation and distance from support networks, including mitigating treatments that can negatively impact mental stability. Unless we deliberately and diligently assess those we serve, we have no awareness of such needs. Although cognitive decline tends to occur insidiously, repetitive assessments are still necessary. With… Read More »

Why Are We Slow to Stop Inappropriate Care?

One of our shortcomings as health care professionals is our acceptance of evidence-based medicine, especially when the data proves that abandoning practices is required.  And despite robust, research cataloging practices, that add little value, such activities remain widespread at a considerable cost and increasing the likelihood to harm. As professionals, the question remains, “Why are we so slow… Read More »

Should We Communicate “Risk Vs. Benefits” When Engaging in Shared Decision Making?

As we continue to improve and enhance our ability to foster shared decision making, the language we utilize to discuss treatments becomes important. Presently, we use the terms “risks” and benefits” in our conversations. However, risks are often unknown, and the benefits seem to be a given. And in actuality, neither statement is valid. When communicating risks, it… Read More »

If We Invest in Social Needs, There Can Be a Great Return

Recently, there is a tremendous amount of focus on the value of social interventions and healthcare costs. To be of optimal help to the greater society, it is important for us to thoroughly understand how to investigate the value of such interventions. In the journal, Health Affairs, a recent study by Kangovi et al. investigates the return on… Read More »