Tag Archives: healthcare delivery

Partnering with Faith-based Leaders to Improve Health Inequities

Out of the numerous learnings from the pandemic, COVID has highlighted several issues within our social structures; one of the most significant findings is the discrepancies in vaccination rates among minorities. For many appropriate reasons, there is a great amount of mistrust.  This behavior originates from historical occurrences leading to fatal outcomes. Another issue being that those that… Read More »

Taking a Deeper Look at Inequity within Our Scientific Process

As we continue to address health inequities, we must also consider underlying structural issues. If I am to deliver care focusing on equity, the basis for my treatment must be grounded in science. However, if my science is flawed due to underlying systemic biases and flaws in study design, we will never progress. Since inequities are pervasive and… Read More »

Is Our Racial Divide Worsening in Healthcare?

In 1973, an article entitled, “Does Race Interfere with the Doctor-Patient Relationship,” was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It pointed out systemic biases that impact the care for those in minority groups. Almost 50 years later, have we improved? Though the article delineated a significant amount of attention that addresses health inequities and the… Read More »

Should Physician Offices Be Bill Collectors?

In our present financial models of healthcare reimbursement, the setup frequently places the physician and their practice staff in a real predicament. Consumers request that they deliver care during their time of need in a reverent and life-giving manner.  Additionally, they are required to collect your co-pay and/or co-insurance while simultaneously understanding your benefit plan, including how much… Read More »

What is our COVID Endgame?

As we continue to struggle with vaccination rates, the debate rages over individual rights and the politicization of the present situation. Because of this it is essential to step back and decide upon our goals.  Are we attempting to eradicate, eliminate, cohabitate, or conflagrate with the virus? With each of these, the endgame is drastically different. For instance,… Read More »

Healthy Equity is A Critical Part of Value-Based Payment Models

As value-based payment models have continued to expand, this expansion has occurred in the more affluent communities. Additionally, communities with more socioeconomically vulnerable individuals were less likely to be selected for joint replacement bundles, another form of a value-based payment. A big reason for this lack of equitable distribution of value-based care, can be linked to the absence… Read More »

How Do We Support Primary Care?

Primary care in the United States accounts for more than one-half of all outpatient visits. Moreover, regardless of the clinical models, primary care is at the core. Unquestionably, primary care is at the center of health equity and preventive care. However, it receives a relatively modest proportion of resources, possesses no federal coordinating capacity, no dedicated research support,… Read More »

CMS STARS ratings – It’s Time for a Change

In 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) introduced the Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating Program to create transparency on hospitals’ quality, by summarizing dozens of metrics on the Hospital Compare website. There was considerable consternation over the validity of the data. In addition to comparing all hospitals to each other, regardless of unique dynamics, all… Read More »

Understanding the Design Characteristics of Primary Care Capitation

Capitation, as a value-based payment model, has been around for decades. Many of us have experimented with variations of capitation, ranging from full capitation for all healthcare services to specialist capitation, to primary care (PCP) capitation. Currently, Primary Care Clinicians are much more comfortable with the nuances of these models because of the expansion of Medicare Advantage. This… Read More »

Taking a Look at What Causes Low-Value Care

Low-value care is defined as the utilization of health services that harm or in which the costs outweigh the possible benefits and there are many reasons for these actions. The desire for clinicians to eliminate situations that might cause harm is a driving factor. Although they may be unable to inform you of precisely what is occurring in… Read More »