Tag Archives: person-centered care

Partnering with Faith-based Leaders to Improve Health Inequities

Out of the numerous learnings from the pandemic, COVID has highlighted several issues within our social structures; one of the most significant findings is the discrepancies in vaccination rates among minorities. For many appropriate reasons, there is a great amount of mistrust.  This behavior originates from historical occurrences leading to fatal outcomes. Another issue being that those that… Read More »

Providing Resources for those Caring for our Elderly with Dementia

As we live longer, certain disease states will continue to become more prevalent in the elderly, such as dementia. Unfortunately, our health care system is focused on episodic care versus the needs of those with chronic conditions, especially when they need long-term services outside of a care setting. The question arises concerning who delivers such care, are they… Read More »

Workforce Wellness Programs: Are They Focused on the Wrong Thing?

Recently, there has been an ongoing debate over the value of workplace wellness programs. It is logical to think that to improve a person’s health, you can provide them with support services such as weight management and disease intervention plans through their worksite and ultimately their health will improve, and costs will decrease for both the employee and… Read More »

What is the Basis for Denial and Conspiracy Theories?

When in conversations with others on complex topics, I am frequently perplexed when what they say seems so illogical to me and incongruent with scientific data.  For instance, currently, in this pandemic, this occurrence could not be more befuddling. Throughout COVID, the amount of “anti-vaxxers,” “anti-maskers,” and those who genuinely believe this is a hoax, is frankly astounding.… Read More »

Cognitive Assessments Can Help Identify Needed Care

As we age, cognitive impairment becomes more likely. Simultaneously, our natural living conditions increase isolation and distance from support networks, including mitigating treatments that can negatively impact mental stability. Unless we deliberately and diligently assess those we serve, we have no awareness of such needs. Although cognitive decline tends to occur insidiously, repetitive assessments are still necessary. With… Read More »

Should We Communicate “Risk Vs. Benefits” When Engaging in Shared Decision Making?

As we continue to improve and enhance our ability to foster shared decision making, the language we utilize to discuss treatments becomes important. Presently, we use the terms “risks” and benefits” in our conversations. However, risks are often unknown, and the benefits seem to be a given. And in actuality, neither statement is valid. When communicating risks, it… Read More »

Study Shows Social Needs Interventions DO Offer Return on Investment

There is a tremendous amount of focus on the value of social interventions like housing and food stability, on the cost of healthcare. For the benefit of all, we must learn how to investigate the value of these interventions. A recent study in Health Affairs by Kangovi et al. examines the return on investment for an evidenced-based community… Read More »