Tag Archives: person-centered care

The Role of Healthcare Systems in Supporting Social Safety Nets

Historically, healthcare systems and social safety net providers have worked in parallel to provide care to their constituents. There have been many instances of cross-pollination and mutual support, but this is not the norm, nor is it done in a manner that significantly enhances the value to all involved parties. The need for collaboration in a meaningful way… Read More »

Determining the Effectiveness of Diagnostic testing

As clinicians, we spend a significant amount of our time attempting to diagnose what is ailing those we treat. And we have an armament of tests to select from and an extensive list of differential diagnoses, ranging from the probable, to the extremely rare yet, potentially fatal. Understanding the effectiveness of our diagnostic tests is important from multiple… Read More »

Physician Practices with Robust Capabilities Spend Less on Medicare Beneficiaries

As consolidation and integration of physician practices occur, especially within organizations that can wrap capabilities around ambulatory clinical care, we must examine the potential benefit to those we serve. This ideal is also the premise for a clinically integrated network where payment models are designed to allow for enhanced capabilities available to smaller groups of clinicians. These enhanced… Read More »

A Look at the Progression of Value-Based Payment Models

For those in the value-based world, we have been on this journey for years. And we have witnessed and participated in CMS and CMMI creating and implementing various models.  Undoubtedly, some have been more successful than others, and there has been an ongoing debate concerning the impact on value-based payment models. Two of the major concerns that have… Read More »

Is Our Need for Choice Driving Up the Cost of Healthcare?

We are a country founded on individual rights. As a society, we have also decided that healthcare is a right of citizenship; we do not permit the denial of care based on one’s ability to pay. Unfortunately, the cost of the administrative components of the healthcare ecosystem is a burden on the overall cost of care. Many of… Read More »

When Should We Stop Certain Regulations?

In healthcare, we have become accustomed to ongoing Medicare regulatory oversight and changes. Many of these regulations are implemented to drive specific behaviors that are focused on improving quality and/or reducing costs. One such measure is the Medicare Two-Night Rule. This rule, created in 2013, was designed to replace the inappropriate inpatient admission status stays with what they… Read More »

Considering Different Payment Models for Primary Care

As we continue to focus on value-based care, how we design our value-based payment models continues to be critical. Historically, we have oversimplified the polarity by placing a fee-for-service on one end of the spectrum and global capitation payments on the opposite side. Thus, creating the idea that these two payment mechanisms are counter to each other, and… Read More »

The Importance of Hope in Patient Care

Both for clinicians and patients, hope is a forceful emotional driver. The psychological benefits of hope are associated with improved physical and mental health, relationships, functional status, and coping. As with any type of emotion, extremes can be detrimental. Patients might become unrealistic, the same with clinicians. So, the question becomes, what is the right amount of hope… Read More »

Partnering with Faith-based Leaders to Improve Health Inequities

Out of the numerous learnings from the pandemic, COVID has highlighted several issues within our social structures; one of the most significant findings is the discrepancies in vaccination rates among minorities. For many appropriate reasons, there is a great amount of mistrust.  This behavior originates from historical occurrences leading to fatal outcomes. Another issue being that those that… Read More »