Tag Archives: person-centered care

Why is Screening for Social Determinants Difficult?

In the present age of healthcare, we understand that social determinants play a critical role in health and wellness, as well as influencing our ability to treat illnesses. Those who identify with issues such as food insecurity, intimate partner violence, availability or quality of housing, and the ability to pay for necessities such as utilities like heat and… Read More »

Recent NY Times Op Ed Has Me Thinking About Exploitation in Healthcare

Last week my post, In Healthcare, Who Protects Us from Misinformation,  I discussed the use of “sensationalism” to garner attention. I also mentioned as healthcare providers it is part of our role to join the conversation to ensure balanced and truthful information is shared. Recently an Op Ed appeared in the New York Times with a catchy title;… Read More »

Trust is Essential for the Physician-Patient Relationship

The majority of literature on trust between physicians and patients focuses on patients believing what their physicians are telling them. Traditionally, the physician has played the role of the single source of information and the patient the receiver without their own level of knowledge. However, with the advancement of technology and research being something searchable at the patient’s… Read More »

On the Topic of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery

In over sixteen hundred articles published since 2000, the value of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is irrefutably clear – “ERAS optimizes operative functional status to improve clinical outcome and patient satisfaction.” ERAS concepts are a comprehensive patient care movement that originated in Europe. By treating undesirable perioperative pathophysiologic processes, like colorectal surgery, which was the first surgery… Read More »

Patient, Person, Customer, Member; Which one is Appropriate?

One of my earliest blogs discusses the difference between using the words person and patient to describe those we serve. We use numerous descriptions, depending on what part of the healthcare ecosystem and the message one is delivering. Health plans frequently refer to those they serve as members, whereas physicians and hospitals use the term patients, patient advocacy… Read More »

It will take a village to improve the healthcare system

I believe we create false distinctions between healthcare and non-healthcare services. Recently I read with great interest a study that explored this issue by Vickery, et al, Cross-Sector Service Use Among High Health Care Utilizers in Minnesota After Medicaid Expansion in Health Affairs. The authors reviewed the service utilization of enrollees across the domains of healthcare, housing, criminal… Read More »

24/7 services improve quality and lower costs

People do not choose when they become sick, injured or require needed services. Other industries comprehend the nature of their businesses and provide coverage that is appropriate to the defined needs. Within the realm of healthcare, this same type of delivery approach is not evident. Ambulatory services tend to follow “banking” hours. Surgeons schedule their cases based on… Read More »