Is Our Racial Divide Worsening in Healthcare?

In 1973, an article entitled, “Does Race Interfere with the Doctor-Patient Relationship,” was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It pointed out systemic biases that impact the care for those in minority groups. Almost 50 years later, have we improved? Though the article delineated a significant amount of attention that addresses health inequities and the… Read More »

How Can We Create Space for Grief?

All too often, we forget that physicians and clinical scientists are humans. Because of this, we do not create the space needed for human reactions in difficult times. Furthermore, we often mention burnout and resilience, yet fail to focus on the underlying humanistic needs required for a healthy psyche and periods of grief. Let’s Consider the Current Models…… Read More »

Should Physician Offices Be Bill Collectors?

In our present financial models of healthcare reimbursement, the setup frequently places the physician and their practice staff in a real predicament. Consumers request that they deliver care during their time of need in a reverent and life-giving manner.  Additionally, they are required to collect your co-pay and/or co-insurance while simultaneously understanding your benefit plan, including how much… Read More »

Compassion Fatigue Is A Threat to Us All

There is a new phenomenon in our health care settings. After an arduous 18 months, those on the frontline of COVID are beginning to experience a completely different form of fatigue and burnout. We are beginning to observe anger at those that have not been vaccinated and refuse to mask.  Recently, Chavi Eve Karkowsky wrote about this in… Read More »

Trust, Truth and the Vaccine

As the COVID pandemic continues to rage on and is once again rapidly accelerating, it’s crucial to step back and ask ourselves, why are we in this situation, when we have excellent public health measures and a very efficacious vaccine? One would think as a society, we can overcome anything as we have proven in the past. Historically,… Read More »

What is our COVID Endgame?

As we continue to struggle with vaccination rates, the debate rages over individual rights and the politicization of the present situation. Because of this it is essential to step back and decide upon our goals.  Are we attempting to eradicate, eliminate, cohabitate, or conflagrate with the virus? With each of these, the endgame is drastically different. For instance,… Read More »

The Importance of Humanism vs. Heroism in Healthcare

A hero is understood to be a person who performs an exceptional feat, putting others in front of oneself. The ideal of heroism represents the convention that an individual can accomplish more than seems possible. The heroic narrative extols three traits: individual skill, willingness to sacrifice, and stoicism in the face of physical and emotional hardship. The culture… Read More »

Healthy Equity is A Critical Part of Value-Based Payment Models

As value-based payment models have continued to expand, this expansion has occurred in the more affluent communities. Additionally, communities with more socioeconomically vulnerable individuals were less likely to be selected for joint replacement bundles, another form of a value-based payment. A big reason for this lack of equitable distribution of value-based care, can be linked to the absence… Read More »

How Do We Support Primary Care?

Primary care in the United States accounts for more than one-half of all outpatient visits. Moreover, regardless of the clinical models, primary care is at the core. Unquestionably, primary care is at the center of health equity and preventive care. However, it receives a relatively modest proportion of resources, possesses no federal coordinating capacity, no dedicated research support,… Read More »

Understanding and Identifying Vaccine Hesitancy

As we continue to focus on optimally providing COVID vaccinations for as many people as possible, there has been a digression into labeling those that are not yet immunized, as being “hesitant.” This labeling oversimplifies the situation and is frankly, incorrect in many cases. Simplifying such language is detrimental to our vaccine success. Similarly, when we identify people… Read More »