Tag Archives: Healthcare Quality

The Role of Healthcare Systems in Supporting Social Safety Nets

Historically, healthcare systems and social safety net providers have worked in parallel to provide care to their constituents. There have been many instances of cross-pollination and mutual support, but this is not the norm, nor is it done in a manner that significantly enhances the value to all involved parties. The need for collaboration in a meaningful way… Read More »

A Bell-Shaped Curve and Healthcare Grading

Healthcare is brimming with competitive clinicians and administrators. CMS and other “grading” agencies pit us against each other concerning benchmarking, penalties, and value-based payments. But does this methodology promote better patient care? Most of our quality and experience metrics are “graded” on a bell-shaped curve; in other words, how we do, compared to others? This constant analysis leads… Read More »

How Can We Lower Administrative Costs?

As we continue to focus on healthcare affordability, the topic of administrative waste rises to the forefront of many discussions. These are the costs associated with the delivery of healthcare and its associated payment functions that do not directly impact the outcome of care. Furthermore, one can view these dollars as detrimental to care because they drive up… Read More »

Understanding Virtual Primary Care, And the Value It Brings

As we continue to identify the benefits of telehealth, we must delineate how this form of technology most efficiently impacts primary care services. One can view such digital interventions as either substitutive or additional. If one utilizes an electronic visit instead of an in-person visit, this is an example of substitution. We are now categorizing this modality as… Read More »

When Should We Stop Certain Regulations?

In healthcare, we have become accustomed to ongoing Medicare regulatory oversight and changes. Many of these regulations are implemented to drive specific behaviors that are focused on improving quality and/or reducing costs. One such measure is the Medicare Two-Night Rule. This rule, created in 2013, was designed to replace the inappropriate inpatient admission status stays with what they… Read More »

The Importance of Hope in Patient Care

Both for clinicians and patients, hope is a forceful emotional driver. The psychological benefits of hope are associated with improved physical and mental health, relationships, functional status, and coping. As with any type of emotion, extremes can be detrimental. Patients might become unrealistic, the same with clinicians. So, the question becomes, what is the right amount of hope… Read More »

Taking a Deeper Look at Inequity within Our Scientific Process

As we continue to address health inequities, we must also consider underlying structural issues. If I am to deliver care focusing on equity, the basis for my treatment must be grounded in science. However, if my science is flawed due to underlying systemic biases and flaws in study design, we will never progress. Since inequities are pervasive and… Read More »

How Do We Support Primary Care?

Primary care in the United States accounts for more than one-half of all outpatient visits. Moreover, regardless of the clinical models, primary care is at the core. Unquestionably, primary care is at the center of health equity and preventive care. However, it receives a relatively modest proportion of resources, possesses no federal coordinating capacity, no dedicated research support,… Read More »

Taking a Look at What Causes Low-Value Care

Low-value care is defined as the utilization of health services that harm or in which the costs outweigh the possible benefits and there are many reasons for these actions. The desire for clinicians to eliminate situations that might cause harm is a driving factor. Although they may be unable to inform you of precisely what is occurring in… Read More »

Healthcare Can Be More Affordable if We Can Limit Waste

The cost of healthcare in the United States is exorbitant. There are multitudes of reasons for our elevated unit price. Many believe, waste, makes up a significant part of the problem. And the largest component of wasteful spending is what we identify as administrative costs. These are dollars that are not improving patient care, and yet, they impact… Read More »