Tag Archives: quality of care

The Value of Nonprofit Hospitals

There has been a great deal of focus on whether nonprofit hospitals bring value to the communities they serve in proportion to their tax-exempt status. The argument is that the tax dollars are necessary and properly utilized for community benefit; therefore, a tax-exempt status requires community benefit in replacement of payments. The measure used as a metric for… Read More »

The Value of an intellectual vs Emotional Approach to the Root Causes of Health Inequities

As we focus on improving the care for all, with a lens toward health equity, it’s essential to examine the root causes of health inequities and their existence. And Racism is a contributing factor that has led to our present situation. To progress, we need to have an understanding and commonality of definitions. Referencing a recent article by… Read More »

A Bell-Shaped Curve and Healthcare Grading

Healthcare is brimming with competitive clinicians and administrators. CMS and other “grading” agencies pit us against each other concerning benchmarking, penalties, and value-based payments. But does this methodology promote better patient care? Most of our quality and experience metrics are “graded” on a bell-shaped curve; in other words, how we do, compared to others? This constant analysis leads… Read More »

CMS STARS ratings – It’s Time for a Change

In 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) introduced the Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating Program to create transparency on hospitals’ quality, by summarizing dozens of metrics on the Hospital Compare website. There was considerable consternation over the validity of the data. In addition to comparing all hospitals to each other, regardless of unique dynamics, all… Read More »

Taking a Look at What Causes Low-Value Care

Low-value care is defined as the utilization of health services that harm or in which the costs outweigh the possible benefits and there are many reasons for these actions. The desire for clinicians to eliminate situations that might cause harm is a driving factor. Although they may be unable to inform you of precisely what is occurring in… Read More »

Building Trust in the Patient-Clinician Relationship

Last week I shared a post, Understanding and Instilling Trust in Our Patients, today’s post takes a deeper look at how to build that trust between patient and clinician. As we continue to focus on building patient trust, it’s necessary to recognize that one’s own characteristics play a critical role. For those times that we are dealing with… Read More »

Practicing Evidence-Based Medicine

As we focus on delivering value, and decreasing waste, clinical appropriateness needs to be considered on a daily basis. Unfortunately, much variation is due to the lack of health care providers following evidence-based guidelines. There are various reasons this occurs, including a lack of consensus between medical societies, ease of disseminating new information when it is published, as… Read More »

How Can Health Systems Help in Eliminating Health Disparities?

As our health systems continue to shift to value-based care, it has become paramount that providing quality care to not just some, but ALL we serve is essential. Therefore, focusing on the health disparities that exist is important since a lack of health equity continues to be a significant factor contributing to poor health in many communities. If… Read More »

On the Topic of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery

In over sixteen hundred articles published since 2000, the value of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is irrefutably clear – “ERAS optimizes operative functional status to improve clinical outcome and patient satisfaction.” ERAS concepts are a comprehensive patient care movement that originated in Europe. By treating undesirable perioperative pathophysiologic processes, like colorectal surgery, which was the first surgery… Read More »