Tag Archives: value-based care

Investment in Social Determinants is Rising

As we continue to focus on value-based care, with special attention put on the social needs of those we serve, how these investments occur becomes paramount. Historically, the buckets of allocated dollars for social needs lived in the public health sector, either by governmental or philanthropic funding. However, as we move towards value-based payment models, other delivery entities… Read More »

Paying for Costly Medical Technologies in a Value-Based World

Healthcare is an industry where innovation and technology continue to progress and create an opportunity to improve lives. However, the cost of such products continues to rise and thus impacts the overall cost of care. But, suppose one surmises the purpose is to enhance care in a manner that delivers value, i.e., where the expense plays a significant… Read More »

Peer Comparisons Can Enhance Value

As the healthcare industry continues to focus on value (improved quality and service, and decreased cost), understanding the human dynamics of physician healthcare providers will enhance our ability to drive change. Incentives are foundational, however, money is not always the primary motivator. Behavioral Science postulates that different people respond differently to similar incentives. We know there is a… Read More »

Preconceived Ideas Don’t Always Lead to What We Expect

A commonly held premise of shared decision-making is that the healthcare profession neither adequately gives specific treatment options nor discusses the trade-offs of surgical intervention. Predominantly, the thought is that if more in-depth conversations were to occur concerning the trade-offs, and there is more appropriate management of expectations, the chosen solution would be the more conservative approach. With… Read More »

Taking a Look at How Clinical Care and Public Health Intersect

Undeniably, individual rights are foundational to our civil liberties. However, we are also socially minded, meaning thinking beyond individual needs, and therefore, we must bridge this polarity. From a care perspective, these dualities remain in two different verticals,1. medical care/treatment, and 2. public health. For example, when I discuss a condition and treatment options with a patient, the… Read More »

What Happens When I am Proven Wrong?

“Hot-spotting” is a method in healthcare to identify areas for intervention. The premise suggests, if I can identify a segment that is responsible for most of a situation and change its trajectory, a positive outcome will occur. This premise is the basis for disease management, and now value-based care concerning social determinants of health. However, a recent randomized… Read More »

When it Comes to Improving Healthcare, Consumers are Accountable Too!

Overall, we focus a considerable amount of time and energy on physician accountability for delivering value to those we serve. However, with consistently increasing costs to the consumer, there is less conversation concerning their responsibility. Currently, there is a societal debate asking what exactly, are the duties of individuals involving their own health and well-being. Undeniably, patients’ behavior… Read More »

Managed Care and Managed Competition Working in Tandem Can Hold Down Costs

As we continue to evaluate the cost of healthcare, two main ideas are gaining traction; managed care and managed competition, both are models designed to enhance value in a market. Defined as patient-centered, managed care coordinates care, thereby providing payment incentives that reward achieving cost, quality, and service measures; thus, offering value-based care, whereas, the managed competition model… Read More »

How Do We Stop Screening When it No Longer Makes Sense?

As healthcare providers, we focus a tremendous amount of activity on screening to prevent illnesses. Whether it is cholesterol checks, mammograms, or colonoscopies, there is a time where the benefit diminishes due to the age or health of an individual. Currently, we are in a situation where screening continues past its efficacy. Therefore, how do we stop? It… Read More »